Myers-Briggs

Which 4 Personality Types Make the Most Successful Entrepreneurs?

Whenever I think about the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator test, I can’t help but compare it a bit to Harry Potter’s Sorting Hat. As soon as it was placed on your head, the Sorting Hat knew which Hogwarts house was the best fit for your future — whether you would spent it being nurtured and educated in Gryffindor, Ravenclaw, Hufflepuff or Slytherin. It may not be a magical hat, but taking the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator assessment allows you to better understand your personality and where you can take your entrepreneurial talents.

Just as there’s no right or wrong Hogwarts house to be sorted in, there is no right or wrong result when taking the Myers-Briggs quiz. However, there are a handful of personality type results that are perfectly in sync for anyone with an entrepreneurial streak.

Let’s take a closer look at how individuals with these personalities can thrive as entrepreneurs.

ENTJ — “The Commander”

If you scored as an ENTJ (extroverted, intuitive, thinking and judging), then congratulations! You were born to embrace entrepreneurship. Individuals that score as this personality type have long understood that in a world full of possibilities, their destiny isn’t to work a desk job for the rest of their lives. They’re natural leaders full of confidence and charisma. An ENTJ is ready to take charge and pursue their dreams, unafraid of the obstacles that lie in their way. If anything, they welcome the challenge to prove themselves.

What separates Commander personalities from the pack is found in their intuitive side. Commanders understand that while they have big dreams to pursue, they need to think logically about the process. The kinds of businesses they start may be unique, but still tap into the needs of their target market even if said market didn’t realize they had that need yet. If a Commander is going into battle (or an entrepreneur going to start a business), you can trust that they are going equipped with a thorough plan of action to reach their goals.



ENFJ — “The Protagonist”

You’ll notice our next personality is one letter off from the Commander. In an ENFJ, the “F” stands for “feeling.” Only 2 percent of ENFJs exist in the world and these individuals tend to play significant roles, like politicians or teachers. They “get” people, and are able to reach and inspire individuals from all backgrounds.

At the core, a genuine ENFJ wants to see the world head into a brighter place and believes that great changes can happen for the better. This aligns perfectly for entrepreneurs with the added bonus that they are influential outside of the business. The passion they have for people, and the world at large, reflects in everything they do and is utterly infectious.

INFJ — “The Advocate”

If you identify as an introverted entrepreneur, this may just be your personality type. An INFJ sees the world much more differently than most. Their personality is even more rare than an ENFJ, making up 1 percent or less in the entire world!

Someone with this type of personality is a visionary in their field, deeply creative and full of imagination. They’re not content to daydream their lives away or put off starting that new business. Thanks to their strong judging abilities, they are able to bring the ideas they believe in to life. Often this comes with a personal price — with an INFJ sidelining their personal needs in favor of their dreams — so it is important that those who identify as INFJ make a habit out of pausing to recharge.


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ESTP — “The Doer”

We haven’t touched on the letters “S” or “P” yet, both of which play a big part in this personality type. An ESTP is extroverted, sensing, thinking and perceiving. Much like the Commander, these individuals are natural born entrepreneurs. They’re the life of the party, invested in risk-taking and truly the masters of their own destinies.

So, what makes them different from Commanders? Unlike a Commander who will approach anything with a plan of action (and likely a few backup plans), ESTP personalities leap head first toward their dreams. If they fall or make mistakes along the way, they fix them and keep going.

Some personalities might be appalled by this approach, but others may find themselves strongly identifying with it.

What do you think the correlation (if any) is between personality type and entrepreneurial success? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below.

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