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5 Tricks That Will Boost Your LinkedIn Company Page

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How often do you update your LinkedIn company page?

Many successful entrepreneurs utilize the professional networking platform to show off the best of what their business has to offer, from sharing job openings to posting videos about their products and offerings. Other novice business owners may not utilize their company LinkedIn page as frequently — and might need a bit of help dusting theirs off!


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Let’s focus on opportunities for punching up your LinkedIn company page:

Pump up your banner image

One of the simplest ways to begin refreshing a LinkedIn company page is to start with the banner image and avatar. The avatar is typically your company logo. It should have your company name and/or an easily recognizable symbol that followers may associate with the brand.

The banner image is akin to that of a banner image on Facebook or Twitter. This image should be one that you design in house or utilizes photography you have permission to use. Ideally, this image should be in a high-resolution format, so it looks clear across all devices.

Play around with your banner image! You may add the following elements to it.

  • Images of people from all walks of life (the Google LinkedIn page does a great job with this type of representation).
  • Hashtags affiliated with your business.
  • The URL to your website.
  • A single bold image that stands out. (TED Conferences nails it with its LinkedIn banner image).


Dive in to the drop-down menu

Once you have a solid banner image and avatar in place, you’ll need to explore the drop-down menu for your LinkedIn company page. This covers information about your business, such as:

  • About. This is the bio of the company. Make it keyword rich, and emphasize your mission and values. Share the location of your business, its industry and size to emphasize to followers that your company has a legitimate presence.
  • Posts. Content posted to your page. This may include images, documents, videos and ads.
  • Jobs. Do you have a job opening? Share it in this space and encourage followers to create job alerts for any future jobs your company lists.
  • Life. This acts as a discovery page. Followers may get an in-depth glimpse at what it’s like to work for your business.
  • People. Learn more about the team by searching for employees by title, keyword or school.
  • Events. If you have an upcoming event, like a livestream or a webinar, you may share the news here.
  • Videos. Watch as your favorite businesses cover every kind of topic, such as how mentorship can change your life to celebrating special anniversaries in business.

You don’t need to focus on building all of these sections immediately. It’s also important to note that some aspects of this menu might not always be applicable to every business . Start with sections you know you can gradually flesh out, and go from there.

Involve your employees

Go beyond encouraging employees to simply “like” posts shared on your LinkedIn company page. Click on the Life button, and you’ll find opportunities are present for all members of your team.

  • Trending employee content. This section aggregates workplace photos and videos posted by employees that are trending on LinkedIn. Civil engineering company Jacobs does a fantastic job in curating this content and sharing it with audiences.
  • Employee perspectives. LinkedIn allows all users to write, publish and share content on the platform. The employee perspectives section allows current employees to reflect on issues that matter to them — or simply share the story of how they got their current job.
  • Employee testimonials. A LinkedIn user often receives recommendations from former colleagues they may share on their profile. This is a similar take — but for business pages. Employees may share public testimonials about the business, what they love about working there and their overall outlook on the company’s future.

The more you focus on filling out this section, the more you’ll be able to give viewers a look at what it’s like to work at your business and attract talent to work for your organization.


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Use a unique CTA button

Your typical LinkedIn company page will have a few buttons under its banner. There’s the follow button, a button for visiting the website and “more” to share in a message.

Your call to action (CTA) buttons don’t always need to use the verbiage of “visit website.” Try options like “sign up” (as used by insurance company Lemonade) or “learn more” to entice followers.

Engage with followers

As you build a robust LinkedIn company page, you’ll need to give your followers a reason to stick around and engage with you.

Don’t leave anyone hanging! Share content, whether it’s news about a new episode of your podcast or information about a new product or service, on a regular basis. Get creative with the copy by including relevant hashtags to reach a wider audience. Add in some emojis, too — where relevant — to engage across all generations of followers.

Key takeaways on building your LinkedIn company page

As time progresses and you build up a nice reputation on LinkedIn, remember to edit your company page accordingly. Add in new job openings, refresh pinned posts and switch out company photos, especially as your business heads into the next normal and has the opportunity to gather team members together again.

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